Why Girls, Why Literacy, Why Now?

https://worldliteracyfoundation.org/Black History Month

Why Girls

Why Girls

Literacy

Schols

Why girls 1Globally, girls face a greater risk of illiteracy than their male peers. Approximately 496 million adult women worldwide cannot read and write (Readingpartners.org) – this is 2/3 of the illiterate population around the world. The long-term impact of this is staggering. From reducing infant mortality, increasing women’s agency, leadership skills, and employment, it is imperative that girls access literacy. The advent of COVID has severely impacted girls’ literacy development and has amplified the challenge they already faced. Increasingly, girls were required to be at home to help support families, and education (an already fought for resource), was seen as even less important. While girls have more obstacles, even one year of schooling can improve a girl’s earnings by 10%-20%. UNICEF research found that if schools remain closed for an extended period, the gains made in girls’ education over the past 25 years are at risk of being undone, particularly enrollment rates and learning outcomes. The threat of gender-based violence, child marriage and early pregnancy increases significantly during a crisis. Why Girls Why Girls Why Girls Why Girls Why Girls UNICEF research found that if schools remain closed for an extended period, the gains made in girls’ education over the past 25 years are at risk of being undone, particularly enrollment rates and learning outcomes. The threat of gender-based violence, child marriage and early pregnancy increases significantly during a crisis.

“If we are going to see real development in the world then our best investment is WOMEN!”

-Desmond Tutu
Why girls 1Globally, girls face a greater risk of illiteracy than their male peers. Approximately 496 million adult women worldwide cannot read and write (Readingpartners.org) – this is 2/3 of the illiterate population around the world. The long-term impact of this is staggering. From reducing infant mortality, increasing women’s agency, leadership skills, and employment, it is imperative that girls access literacy. The advent of COVID has severely impacted girls’ literacy development and has amplified the challenge they already faced. Increasingly, girls were required to be at home to help support families, and education (an already fought for resource), was seen as even less important. While girls have more obstacles, even one year of schooling can improve a girl’s earnings by 10%-20%. UNICEF research found that if schools remain closed for an extended period, the gains made in girls’ education over the past 25 years are at risk of being undone, particularly enrollment rates and learning outcomes. The threat of gender-based violence, child marriage and early pregnancy increases significantly during a crisis.

“There is no greater pillar of stability than a strong, free, and educated woman.”

– Angelina Jolie

An investment in girls’ education is an investment in their future and their communities. Women’s participation in society is key to development; literate women contribute to their countries’ economic prosperity and security.

Women with secondary school-level education can expect to earn twice as much as their counterparts with no education at all, empowering them to support themselves and their families, breaking the cycle of intergenerational poverty. Without reading and writing skills, women can be limited to occupations focused on childcare and housework, which are often unpaid or underpaid.

“When women are educated, their countries become stronger and more prosperous.”

– Michelle Obama

This year the World Literacy Foundation is celebrating and advocating women’s literacy! We want to offer sponsorship to at least 100 girls this month and #breakthebias.

Join us and donate just $25 a month!

Why girls 2

“You know, we’re in a sports center. Imagine if you have a team and you don’t let half of the team play. That’s stupid. That makes no sense. And the evidence shows that communities that give their daughters the same opportunities as their sons, they are more peaceful, they are more prosperous, they develop faster, they are more likely to succeed.”

– Barack Obama

Autor: Krishna Nathwani

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